[MEDIA RELEASE] What is Your Breast Cancer Risk Score? Genetic Tool Predicts Breast Cancer Risks in Asians

A ground-breaking genetic study in Asian women led by Malaysian scientists in collaboration with Singapore and the University of Cambridge revealed that a genetics tool developed to help European women assess breast cancer risk also works in Asian women.

[Q&A] Malaysia’s Best Science Communicator on Communicating Science

Science Media Centre Malaysia spoke to Atteleth Don, the winner of FameLab Malaysia National Final 2020 Championship recently on his win and what it takes to communicate science effectively. Don beat 11 other science communicators from across the country with his winning talk ‘Save our Homes by Saving our Mangroves.’

[MEDIA RELEASE] Impact of COVID-19 on Hepatitis Elimination

Viral hepatitis is a communicable disease that can cause serious liver damage and liver cancer. Deaths from viral hepatitis, the majority (96%) are due to hepatitis B and C, are rising worldwide compared to the downward trend for the other three most common causes of communicable diseases. However, hepatitis is preventable, treatable, and for Hepatitis C, curable with timely treatment.

[OPINION] Connecting experts in the interest of science

As the world grapples with COVID-19, healthcare professionals are working round the clock to keep COVID-19 patients alive, medical scientists are racing to develop treatments and vaccines, epidemiologists are modelling infection rates to predict how the virus will continue to spread, and science journalists are disseminating news while battling the spread of misinformation.

[RESEARCH INSIDER] Volcano monitoring: Linking volcanic processes

Research Insider this week gets up close with Stanley Yip who is in his first year pursuing a PhD in Geology at the University of Bristol, UK with his major focusing on volcanology. His goal is to understand magma properties using satellite data to measure sulfur dioxide emissions from volcanoes and volcano deformation.

[OPINION] Microplastic Pollution and Health

Microplastics, broadly defined < 5 mm, are plastic particles of different shape, size and polymer composition. Recently, there has been extensive media coverage on microplastic pollution including news release from the World Health Organization on the potential environmental health threat from microplastics. Single-use plastics and inappropriate plastic waste management are the primary reasons for pollution.

[MEDIA RELEASE] WHO discontinues hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir treatment arms for COVID-19

These interim trial results show that hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir produce little or no reduction in the mortality of hospitalized COVID-19 patients when compared to standard of care. Solidarity trial investigators will interrupt the trials with immediate effect.

[RESEARCH INSIDER] Self-harm: What do our genes have to do with it?

Research Insider this week gets up close with Kai Xiang Lim who is in his second year pursuing a PhD in Social, Genetics and Developmental Psychiatry Research at King's College London, UK. He uses genetic information to investigate the underlying causes of self-harm behaviours and their relationships with mental health conditions.

[Q&A] Know Your Microbiome: Your Questions, Our answers

We celebrated World Microbiome Day 2020 over the weekend by hosting a webinar "Gut feeling is real science: Know your gut microbiome!" with our expert speakers from Malaysia and Singapore who provided insights on the connection of gut microbiome to our health and mental state. During the live session, we received many questions from viewers but did not have time to get to everyone. So as promised, here are answers to some of the questions we did not get a chance to answer.

[OPINION] Have we found the panacea to COVID-19 with remdesivir, an old but newly packaged drug?

As of 12 May 2020, 4,425,094 people have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 with deaths reaching 297,723.Doctors are desperately looking for an effective drug, and there have been a number of candidates on trial; one of them, remdesivir, is probably the most exciting of all. This is the drug developed for the Ebola epidemic in 2015, but it was found to be less effective in clinical trials than in in vitro studies. Is remdesivir the panacea for COVID-19?